theworldfrommykitchen

My Global Food Challenge


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Czech Republic

czech republic-flagWhile I really haven’t taken many short cuts so far, there are some days when I have more time constraints than others.  I wanted to make the pierogis, but hesitated because of the homemade pastry aspect, until I found this “Cheater Pierogi” recipe from Chef John using wonton wrappers.

Additions/Omissions: For the stuffed peppers, I left out the sour cream as usual and for the pierogis, I used beef bacon and different cheese blends, but did not use the sour cream and chives.

Taste Test: While the sauce was obviously redder and less creamy, it still worked out well, and was wonderful with the stuffed peppers.  

Zip Facts about Czech Republic:

  • Austrians Gregor Mendel, the Father of Genetics, and Sigmund Freud, the Father of Psychoanalysis, were both born in the Czech Republic
  • According to Czech etiquette on entering a building, a man is required to let his female companion enter first unless it is a restaurant
  • On St. Václav Day, during the last weekend of September, Czech families participate in the national passion of competitive mushroom hunting
  • The Czech Republic boasts the world’s largest per capita beer drinkers
  • After Slovenia, Czech Republic is the second richest country in Eastern Europe

Czech Andre Dluhos Tutt'Art@ (50)Andre Dluhos

http://www.tuttartpitturasculturapoesiamusica.com/2015/02/Andre-Dluhos.html

Link to Recipe: https://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/czech-republic

Link to Map:   https://theworldfrommykitchen.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/recipemap-europe.pdf

288px-Czech_Republic_Josef_Váchal

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Dominica

dominica-flagChicken and fruit? What could be bad about that? A prepared mango chutney was listed in the ingredients, but I had the time to make one from scratch (see the Caribbean chutney recipe). In one of my Food Network marathons, I watched Geoffrey Zakarian, one of my all-time favorite chefs, easily cut a mango from its pit, close to the pit on the flat sides and trim to the pit on the other sides. Obvious, until you are working with a slippery mango.

Additions/Omissions:   Considering my family’s palates, I tend to go easy on the peppers, so half of a Habañero pepper was plenty for the chutney, and I omitted the mustard seed. I also used ripe ginger, since I had it on hand.

Taste Test: The chicken and mango salad were excellent, and despite the substitutions and omissions, so was the chutney.

Zip Facts about the Dominica:

  • Major scenes from both “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest” and “POTC: At World’s End” were filmed in Dominica
  • The economy of Dominica relies heavily on banana production and exportation. Tourism serves as a needed boost when banana values drop.  Watch out for the many inhabitants that carry cutlasses (machetes) around town
  • Dominica comes from the Latin word meaning “Sunday”, the country’s original name is Wai’tukubuli, which translates as “tall is her body”
  • Since 1978, Ross University (associated with DeVry USA) has been successfully educating the world’s doctors
  • “Boiling Lake”, in Dominica, is the world’s second largest hot spring

Dominica MarcellePauline Marcelle, “Bend Down Boutique 61” (2012)

http://arcthemagazine.com/arc/2012/06/pauline-marcelle-everywhere-is-somewhere-else/

Link to Recipe:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/dominica/

Link to Map:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/recipemap-northamerica.pdf

602px-Dominica_2002_Kennedy_sheetlet_a


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Guinea

guinea-flagAdditions/Omissions:  

Taste Test:                                                                                                  

Zip Facts about Guinea:

  • Guinea was the only Africa colony to vote for a new constitution or immediate independence in 1958 when Charles de Gaulle of France offered those opportunities
  • Guinea is sometimes called Guinea-Conakry to avoid confusion between Guinea-Bissau after its capital and largest city. It is believed that the name “Guinea” came from the Susu word “guinè” meaning woman was misunderstood by arriving Europeans, who encountered women washing clothes in an estuary, thought they were referring to the geographic area rather than themselves
  • Almost half of the Guinea population is under 15 so colonial rule is quickly becoming ancient history
  • Many Guineas can only afford to eat one meal a day and proteins may be lacking as well. Despite this, visitors arriving at mealtime are encourage to join in and may be eaten from a communal bowl with spoons.  Men may eat from a different bowl than the women and it is considered impolite to walk and eat at the same time
  • Women, especially in the rural areas of the country, may spend a portion of her life in a polygamous marriage, giving birth to an average of five children and being considerably less educated. Other taking care of the children, the cooking and the cleaning, they are expected to contribute by weeding and gardening the family plots

Guinea Namsa Leuba

Namsa Leuba (Photographer), “The African Queens”

http://theculturetrip.com/africa/nigeria/articles/the-4-female-african-artists-you-should-know-a-contemporary-feminine-world/

Link to Recipe: http://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/guinea/

Link to Map:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/recipemap-africa.pdf

350px-Guinea_1998_Butterflies_MS


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Hong Kong

hong kong-flagAdditions/Omissions:

Taste Test:                                                                                                    

Zip Facts about Hong Kong:

  • Hong Kong, meaning “fragrant harbor”, has been officially designated since 1997 as the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People’s Republic of China. Contrary to this fact, most residents identify more with their Hong Kong culture and traditions than either with China or with their former UK administration
  • Hong Kong still uses traditional complex Chinese characters, unlike China and Singapore which have adopted more simplified characters
  • Hong Kong cuisine features a wide variety of ethnic foods, although Cantonese-style Chinese food is widely popular, particularly yam chah (dim sum). Hong Kong rates as one the highest per capita consumers of the world’s fast food and concentrations of cafes and restaurants (one for every 600 people)
  • In 2005, Disney opened its third theme park (Hong Kong Disney) outside of the U.S. and its first in China
  • Hong Kong has the most skyscrapers (8000 with more than 14 floors) in the world, almost doubling New York City

Hong Kong ko-sin-tung-gateway-to-________-2014-jigsaw-puzzle-butterboomKo Sin Tung, “Gateway to ____” (2014)

http://edouardmalingue.com/artists/ko-sin-tung/

Link to Recipe:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/hong-kong/

Link to Map:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/recipemap-asia1.pdf

532px-Hong_Kong_2013_150th_stamp_anniv_miniature_sheet


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Honduras

honduras-flagAdditions/Omissions:

Taste Test:                                                                                                    

Zip Facts about Honduras:

  • Honduras (meaning “depths”) was named by Christopher Columbus for the deep waters at the mouth of the Tinto o Negro River off the northeast Mosquito Coast (a long series of sand beaches and freshwater lagoons)
  • Beans and corn tortillas are the staples in the Honduran diet, along with the popular plantains and manioc (cassava). Women make the tortillas and, if maize is boiled, ground, pounded out and toasted, it may take hours a day
  • When a Honduran couple marries, they and their family take on both names, hyphenated with the man’s name first
  • The Honduran flag has five stars, the center star represents Honduras because it is the only country which touches the other four countries in Central America
  • The American writer, O. Henry, first coined the term “Banana Republic” to describe a fictional republic in a collection of short stories based on his experiences in Honduras

Honduras miguel-angel-ruiz-matute-lazaro-a-la-luzMiguel Ángel Ruiz Matute, “Lázaro a la luz (Lazarus in the Light)”

http://www.pintoreslatinoamericanos.com/2012/09/pintores-hondurenos-miguel-angel-ruiz.html

Link to Recipe:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/honduras/

Honduras 2005 Fuji Mountain stamp and Parque Nacional Pico Bonito Waterfall Honduras


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Iraq

iraq-flagAdditions/Omissions:  

Taste Test:                                                                                                    

Zip Facts about Iraq:

  • Arabs in Iraq have names which start with their first name, followed by their father’s name, their paternal grandfather’s name, and lastly their family name. Women normally do not take their husband’s name
  • “The Thousand and One Nights”, a collection of Arab folk tales from Iraq which includes the famous stories of “The Voyage of Sinbad the Sailor”, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, and Aladdin and the Magic Lamp”. tells of Scheherazade who marries a king who had disposed of his previous wives. To stay alive, she tells him a story each night for 1001 nights, leaving the ends as cliffhangers
  • The meat in an Iraqi meal is commonly sheep or goat, and includes organ meat, along with the feet, eyes, and ears.   The main meal may start with an appetizer, such as kebabs, and end with a salad and khubaz (a buttered flat wheat bread)
  • Iraq is the purported birthplace of Abraham and Isaac’s wife Rebekah and the site of the biblical Garden of Eden
  • Traditional marriages are still arranged, although urban couples prefer to find their own spouse. In about half of the cases, preference is given to first and second cousins

Iraq wasimaWasima Al-Agha (a thought-provoking depiction of Iraqi women)

http://www.arthistoryarchive.com/arthistory/contemporary/Iraqi-Art.html

Link to Recipe:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/iraq/

180px-Iraq_1989_Women_150f


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Kenya

kenya-flagAdditions/Omissions:  

Taste Test:                                                                                               

Zip Facts about Kenya:

  • English is the official language, along with Kiswahili (Swahili, which means “coast” in Arabic) which is a combination of Arabic and Bantu
  • Maize (corn) is a staple food in Kenya and may be prepared as posho, a porridge. Ugali, a beef stew, is often eaten, and although meat is expensive, whole goats may be roasted on special occasions. Side dishes include boiled greens or banana porridge
  • Women in rural areas bear much of the workload, they work in the fields, take care of the household responsibilities, tend garden and taking food to market
  • The word “chai” in Swahili means “tea”, both tea and beer are the favorite beverage choices, but usually not served cold. Although coffee is one of the main exports, Kenyans rarely ever drink it
  • Polygamy is not uncommon, and 10 cows seem to be the going dowry rate

Kenya butamaAlern Butama

http://www.timotca.org/art/Kenya.html

Link to Recipe:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.wordpress.com/kenya/

Link to Map:  https://theworldfrommykitchen.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/map-of-africa.pdf

180px-Kenya_2007_Breast_Cancer_Research_a